Youth Mixed Migrants, Human trafficking and exploitation in Egypt and the Middle East Lost, are they found?

Breakout Session
Main Building Chapel

In recent years, patterns of forced migrations have shifted in ways to impose increased risk to migrants and refugees exposing them to human trafficking, smuggling and exploitation. Over the past few years, countries in the Middle East have become host to more than 4.2 million new refugees mostly from African and Middle Eastern countries. Egypt became an increasingly important destination country during the late 2000s for migrants and asylum seekers from more than 60 countries, including Palestinians, East Africans, South Asians and, more recently, Iraqis and Syrians. This is while under-development, limited employment opportunities and/or conflict undermine survival and prospects for young people.

This session will describe the landscape of youth mixed migrants and victims of trafficking in four global hub cities with focus on Egypt. This is with the overall goal to present opportunities for short and long term interventions. Preliminary findings from a recent United Nations multi-country study (2017-2018) on youth mixed migrants will be consulted.

Objectives

1. Understand the relationship between trafficking, smuggling and exploitation in the context of youth mixed migrants.
2. Analyze the cascade of daily survivor stressors of youth migrants in transit.
3. Discuss cultural and regional determinants of exploitation and trafficking in the Middle East.
4. Determine medical and healthcare service gaps.
5. Describe contextual, protection, policy and cultural barriers to reach migrant youth and victims of exploitation and trafficking.
6. Identify opportunities for intervention in Egypt and neighboring countries.